Kids are more susceptible to brain injury, and concussion has implications beyond what we thought

By: Pankaj Sah, Director - Queensland Brain Institute, The University of Queensland. Co-authored by Donna Lu, science writer at the Queensland Brain Institute.

Head knocks in childhood are by no means uncommon, yet they may have lasting negative effects. New research has found a link between concussion in childhood and adverse medical and social outcomes as an adult.

Researchers from the United Kingdom, United States and Sweden looked at data from the entire Swedish population born between 1973 and 1982 – some 1.1 million people – to analyse the effect of experiencing a traumatic brain injury in the first 25 years of life.